Language

Since I am linguist, I love to play with word structures, and enjoy theorising about stuff, so I invented my own system of phomes, ones which I believe apply to the structure of words in any language.

The system is largely based on IPA and stems from my love of magical Japanese.

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Consants – I follow a system of approx. 35 consants. It is obviously broken down into types – such as labia and dental, though I base everything on relationships in the Zodiac.

Dental – [ t ] [ d ] [ θ (th) ] [ ð (dh) ]
Labia – [ p ] [ b ] [ f (ph) ] [ v (bh) ]
Alveolar – [ s ] [ z ] [ ʃ (sh) ] [ ʒ (zh)]
Velor – [ x (ks) ] [ k ] [ g ] [ ɤ (gz) ] [ q (kh) ] [ ɣ (gh) ]
Nasal – [ m ] [ n ] [ ŋ (ng) ]
Liquid – [ r ] [ l ] [ h ]

Kh = (Kw) = Qu = Q

Within words are duplicate constants, such as: ss, tt, kk. Below are my interpretation. They act as a consant procceding a glottial stop.

[dt] [dth] [bp] [bph] [zs] [zsh] [ɤx] [gk] [gkh] [nm] [rl]

If you don’t know, the proper pronounciation for “x” is “ks”, as in “paradox”.

I like the idea of “rr; rh” and “ll; lh” in worlds such as “carr” and “call”. The letters “r”, “l” and “h” are used to extend the pronounciation of vowels.

S-consontant.

[ c (ts) ] [ j (dz) ]
[ ɸ (ps)] [ β (bz) ]
[ ?? (ms) ] [ ?? (nz) ]

Don’t know what to do with with these, but I like them.

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Vowels – this is the evolution of my vowel usage. For a long time, I used 6 vowels, including “y” as and individual letter. Recent development in my studies has concluded that their are more than double that original number – examples below.

[ a ] [ e ] [ i ] [ o ] [ u ] [ y ] – soft sound, quark
[ α ] [ ε ] [ ι ] [ ο ] [ υ ] [ ψ ] – hard sound, anti-quark

[ ()αa ] [ ()εe ] [ ()ιi ] [ ()οo ] [ ()υu (w) ] [ ()ψy ] – meson

These double vowels act as semi-consonats. Such a Aaron or water. A “w” for example, is both similar vowel pronunciations, and can be used in combination with a consonant.

Another possibility, is to relate the 6 vowels to the 6 quarks, and their anti-quarks. They are the music of the universe, each producing a unique tone.

Palatalised –

In Japanese, the usage of the “y” extends to a composite of consants and vowels.

[ ()ya ] [ ()ye ] [ ()yi ] [ ()yo ] [ ()yu ]
[ ()ψα ] [ ()ψε ] [ ()ψι ] [ ()ψο ] [ ()ψυ ]

ty() = ch() = ʧ()
dy() = jh() = ʤ()

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I do not use the letter “c”, it is simply a modified “k” with a different inflection. The letter “w” is a doubled “u”, treated as unique phome. Rather, i’d use “uυ”, since it exists in Greek as “ω”. Unlike IPA, which uses “ch” and “j”, I use the above mentioned system of composite letters to reflect pronounciation.

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Possible letters, used in fictional languages, such as my favourite – Tengwar:

yy / yψ / yh
ɦ (hh)
mh
nh
ŋh

I have my own version modified of English Mode Tengwar, which includes some of these letters. It would be fantastic to post in Tengwar font (lol).

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Those not familiar with European languages won’t notice that their is fact more than 5 vowels in use. The two types are: hard and soft. Mostly, English uses such phomes “ae”, “oe” to represent unique vowels.

man – sounds similar to bun, while bun (the snack), sounds like short “boon”.
mαn – the pronounciation of the word for an adult male uses a lazy-sounding “a”.

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